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  • Julie T. Kinn 4:34 pm on August 30, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , goals,   

    Happy birthday blog: Revisiting the first post, “Start Your Own Writing Group” 

    In celebration of this blog’s one-year anniversary, I’m reposting the first item. Oh, how young we all were!

    –JTK

    Want some nerdy fun that can help advance your career? Start your own writing group! You have several options, including:

    • A group of random writers from a variety of disciplines. Check out Meetup to see if there are already any groups meeting regularly in a cafe near you. These are fun if your goal is to meet new folks or work on your personal goal setting. However, you may not get a lot of useful feedback on your paper about neural network architecture.
    • A group of peers at work. Good times if you actually like your co-workers (yes, I fall into that category). You can either start a formal group (invite everyone) or informal (just ask around and let it grow organically). The danger in a formal group is that if you are in a leadership position, your invitation can come off more like an expectation. No one likes feeling voluntold.
    • A virtual writing group. There’s no reason you need a group in vivo. There are scads of ways to meet online using a FaceBook page, google docs, virtual teleconferencing or even Second Life. This is especially useful if you are one of a handful of folks studying your particular fascinating fungus. If there seems to be a lot of response to this blog, maybe we can set up something in this forum.

    Okay, so you and a bunch of like-minded others have pens, paper and lattes. What’s next? Again, you’ve got some choices:

    • A real feedback group. Group members provide drafts and get constructive feedback. Not just “this is great!”. Good when you don’t have other sources of feedback.
    • A fake feedback group. Group members share drafts and are told “this is great!”. Pretty annoying if you are expecting constructive feedback, but everyone needs unconditional love once in a while.
    • A goal-setting group. This is my personal fave. Hold regularly-scheduled brief meetings (30 minute tops) to go around the group and state progress on goals and set new ones.

    Any other formats I’ve neglected? What works for you?

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  • Julie T. Kinn 4:11 am on September 9, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: academics, goals, , publishing   

    Publication Goals: How much to publish 

    I’m a big believer in setting specific goals to help accomplish objectives.  The literature is pretty consistent: setting measurable goals helps us finish what we start.

    There’s no set rule for appropriate publication goals for academics.  Most research universities expect tenure-track junior faculty to average about two or three peer-reviewed articles a year.  Of course, there’s lots of wiggle room.  First-authored pubs count more than others.  Top-tiered journals count more than the Journal of Some Guy’s Basement.

    I’ve set my goal as three peer-reviewed articles yearly.  Since I’m not working for a University, I’m fortunate to have a job that allows me to publish as much as I like.  In truth, I’m pretty happy to publish in the Journal of Some Other Guy’s Basement.  I just want to make sure that I do have a publication record in case I want to go into academia some day.

    What is your publication goal? How did you set it, and have you achieved what you sought?

     

     
    • Anonymous 3:29 pm on September 9, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t really have a publication goal… I just try to publish whatever I’ve been working on most recently. Maybe something to think about. Probably 1 or 2 a year would be good since I’m not at a research institution. Also, I have a heavy teaching load, so my supes cut me some slack.

    • Anonymous 11:48 am on September 9, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      I’m lucky if I publish anything at all!

    • Anonymous 10:07 am on September 10, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      I have been fortunate to publish along side some great researchers in the field of psychology. I do not have a PhD and still feel conflicted about going “all the way” but I do love the opportunity to create a paper–well, to be honest, I have a love/hate relationship with the process, but I am rooted in a deep curiosity and thirst for knowledge so, the article is a product of that journey. Do you have any tips for collaborating on papers? It seems that when the ideas are following, folks that come together to write an article are excited, however, the process in actually creating the paper is so different for everyone involved that it can make for difficult situations. What are your thoughts?

  • Julie T. Kinn 12:43 pm on August 27, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , goals,   

    Start Your Own Writing Group 

    Want some nerdy fun that can help advance your career? Start your own writing group! You have several options, including:

    • A group of random writers from a variety of disciplines. Check out Meetup to see if there are already any groups meeting regularly in a cafe near you. These are fun if your goal is to meet new folks or work on your personal goal setting. However, you may not get a lot of useful feedback on your paper about neural network architecture.
    • A group of peers at work. Good times if you actually like your co-workers (yes, I fall into that category). You can either start a formal group (invite everyone) or informal (just ask around and let it grow organically). The danger in a formal group is that if you are in a leadership position, your invitation can come off more like an expectation. No one likes feeling voluntold.
    • A virtual writing group. There’s no reason you need a group in vivo. There are scads of ways to meet online using a FaceBook page, google docs, virtual teleconferencing or even Second Life. This is especially useful if you are one of a handful of folks studying your particular fascinating fungus. If there seems to be a lot of response to this blog, maybe we can set up something in this forum.

    Okay, so you and a bunch of like-minded others have pens, paper and lattes. What’s next?  Again, you’ve got some choices:

    • A real feedback group. Group members provide drafts and get constructive feedback. Not just “this is great!”. Good when you don’t have other sources of feedback.
    • A fake feedback group. Group members share drafts and are told “this is great!”. Pretty annoying if you are expecting constructive feedback, but everyone needs unconditional love once in a while.
    • A goal-setting group. This is my personal fave. Hold regularly-scheduled brief meetings (30 minute tops) to go around the group and state progress on goals and set new ones.

    Any other formats I’ve neglected? What works for you?

     

     
    • Fiona 12:57 pm on September 10, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      It’s hard to do constructive criticism correctly. People’s feelings can get hurt so easily. But I still want to give good feedback,.

      • Julie T. Kinn 9:37 am on September 24, 2011 Permalink | Reply

        Howdy Fiona,

        Good point! I’m currently working on a two-part series for the blog… Constructive Criticism: Giving it (Part I) and Taking it (Part II). Thanks for the good idea!

        Julie

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